Each Year, More than 400,000 Newborns in the U.S. are Exposed to Tobacco Toxins Before Birth.

Tobacco smoke causes a wide range of reproductive disorders that can harm babies and unborn children. Smoking damages the health of pregnant women and may prevent couples from conceiving children altogether.

TOBACCO SMOKE CAUSES:

SIDS

Babies whose mothers smoked or were exposed to secondhand smoke during pregnancy are more likely to die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome or SIDS. Babies who are exposed directly to secondhand smoke are also more likely to die of SIDS. More than 400,000 babies born in the U.S. every year have been exposed to toxic tobacco chemicals before birth.

PRETERM DELIVERY AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT

Mothers who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to deliver their babies early. Preterm delivery is a leading cause of death, disability, and disease among newborns. Smoking during pregnancy can cause tissue damage in the fetus, especially in the lungs and brain.

BIRTH DEFECTS

Women who smoke during early pregnancy are more likely to deliver babies with cleft lips and/or cleft palates—conditions in which the lip or palate fails to form completely. Both conditions interfere with an infant’s ability to eat properly, and both must be corrected with surgery.

SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION

In the United States, 18 million men over age 20 suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED). A man with ED can’t have and maintain an erection that is adequate for satisfactory sexual performance, which can affect reproduction. Recent evidence concludes that smoking is a cause of ED.

Click here to learn more about the reproductive dangers of smoking (page 14).